huancabamba Trichocereus peruvianus

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  One of at least several forms expressed by seedlings of the purported Trichocereus peruvianus huancabamba is shown below. This one was grown by Oasis from seeds that Kermit had obtained from Mesa Garden.

Trichocereus peruvianus huancabamba

Trichocereus peruvianus huancabamba

Under some conditions of growth the pachanot can look rather similar.

Copyright © by Keeper Trout

Trichocereus species flowers

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   A comparison of the flowers from a few assorted Trichocereus species that appear to be closely related to each other based on their simple morphology. (click here for a larger version):

Trichocereus-flowers-compared

Trichocereus-flowers-compared

Trichocereus-flowers-compared

Trichocereus-flowers-compared

Trichocereus-flowers-compared

Copyright © by Keeper Trout

 

Ecuador – short-spined Trichocereus pachanoi

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  Three images shared by Michael Smith of  short-spined Trichocereus pachanoi growing in Ecuador.
  Spine length can be extremely variable so it surprisingly can often be a feature that does not help much with species assignment in this area. (Trichocereus peruvianus similarly expresses a range of spination from short to long.)

pachanoi-Ecuador

 

 

A pachanot with some black hairs

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  Blackish and brown hairs arising from the axils of the scales on the pericarpel of a pachanot in Oakland. 


blackish hairs on a pachanot
 

 

Copyright © by Keeper Trout

 

 

 

pachanot production

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  The images on this page show pachanot production in a large wholesale commercial nursery operation in southern California. These are produced in bulk as pristine high-quality new-growth tips that are sold as unrooted but healed cuttings to many retail nurseries. Their customers typically then root them, sometimes then growing them out into various sizes of nursery pots, and then resell them as their nursery stock. I’ll bet that many readers in the USA have actually seen these people’s material in their local big chain home improvement centers.

  If this was hybrid, whether produced by a horticulturalist’s hands or encountered in the wild, it would be hard for any professional cactus grower to not recognize it as a serious potential money maker due to its features of not just having a growth rate driven by hybrid vigor but possessing large, showy and pleasantly fragrant flowers that occurred reliably and abundantly in almost any mild to moderate temperate climate, its habit of freely branching into multicolumn specimens, a highly favorable responsiveness and toleration to cuttings being taken, and its high water tolerance with no moderate drought and freeze hardiness.

 

 

pachanot production

pachanot production
pachanot production

That certainly is some pachanot production.
Is there any wonder why this predominates
the horticultural market in the USA?

Photographs © copyright by Anonymous;
reproduced with permission by Trout’s Notes

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H 79960

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H 79960 Trichocereus aff. bridgesii growing in a private collection in Monrovia, California.

 

H 79960 Trichocereus aff. bridgesii

 

  The plant shown above was obtained from the Huntington (with their permission and assistance).

 

 

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Cochabamba, Bolivia Trichocereus pachanoi

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  Cochabamba, Bolivia holds at least one fascinating Trichocereus pachanoi form.

  These are apparently propagated by a convent.

Cochabamba_Dani

The following images are enlargements of sections of detail on several of the images above.

 

Photographs are copyright by Dani; reproduced with permission.

My THANKS to Michael S. Smith for noticing these
and for obtaining permission for their inclusion!

Ecuador – a spiny Trichocereus pachanoi

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  A closer view of a spiny Trichocereus pachanoi cultivated at Quito, Ecuador.

  Both long and short spined forms of pachanoi are common in Ecuador (similar to the picture in Peru). It has been proposed that the short spined versions were developed by human selection but as far as I can tell this is entirely still speculative.

Ecuador pachanoi Hubbie Smidlak 2008

Image copyright by Hubbie Smidlak 2008;
reproduced with permission by Trout’s Notes

 

More pachanoi at Quito, Ecuador
pachanoi at Vilcabamba, Ecuador
pachanoi in Peru
pachanoi in Bolivia 

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cuttings of Trichocereus pachanoi from Peru

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  These are cuttings of a bona fide Trichocereus pachanoi from Peru that were harvested at Matucana and then shipped to the USA. These provided the botanical material that was analyzed by Olabode Ogunbodede; with results published in the 15 September 2010 issue of the Journal of Ethnopharmacology (Volume 131, Issue 2, Pages 356–362).

  These tips spent some months inside of a box traveling through the postal system. Obtaining these cuttings proved to be a surreal adventure as it took well over a year with many convolutions including the final delivery lacking identification labels and documentation. It was nothing short of a minor miracle that successful delivery was actually realized. 

 

cuttings of Trichocereus pachanoi from Peru

cuttings of Trichocereus pachanoi from Peru

cuttings of Trichocereus pachanoi from Peru

 

Images copyrighted by & courtesy of
the Cactus Conservation Institute

 

 

 

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new growth

Image

  The new growth on a pachanot.

  This is a very typical new tip for a pachanot. Its no surprise this plant is so widely loved for its beauty.

new growth

 

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Copyright © by Keeper Trout