Xystocheir dissecta

Xystocheir dissecta is also known as the Redwood Xystocherini.

It was difficult to get an image of this tiny millipede that was not just a blur.

 

Xystocheir dissecta

Xystocheir dissecta

Xystocheir dissecta

A millipede Xystocheir dissecta

Xystocheir dissecta

Xystocheir dissecta

Xystocheir dissecta

Xystocheir dissecta

 

This may be the same thing farther after molting? This was moving too fast to be sure.

maybe Xystocheir dissecta

maybe Xystocheir dissecta

maybe Xystocheir dissecta

maybe Xystocheir dissecta

Titiotus sp.

Titiotus is a genus of fairly large spiders that is endemic to California.

I don’t know the species. The body on this is almost an inch long (longer than 2 cm).

These are fairly aggressive; or at least they bite me.

‪Titiotus‬ sp.

‪Titiotus‬ sp.

‪Titiotus‬ sp.

‪Titiotus‬ sp.

‪Titiotus‬ sp.

‪Titiotus‬ sp.

‪Titiotus‬ sp.

‪Titiotus‬ sp.

‪Titiotus‬ sp.

‪Titiotus‬ sp.

This spider bites.

Uroctonus mordax

Uroctonus mordax is our common “Forest scorpion”.

It looks formidable but in a handful of experiences the sting has so-far always hurt less than that of a honey bee.

Uroctonus mordax

Uroctonus mordax

Uroctonus mordax

Uroctonus mordax

Uroctonus mordax

Uroctonus mordax

Uroctonus mordax

Uroctonus mordax

Uroctonus mordax

Uroctonus mordax

Uroctonus mordax

Uroctonus mordax

Uroctonus mordax

Uroctonus mordax

Uroctonus mordax

Uroctonus mordax

Uroctonus mordax

Uroctonus mordax

Uroctonus mordax

Uroctonus mordax

Uroctonus mordax

Uroctonus mordax

Uroctonus mordax

Uroctonus mordax

Uroctonus-mordax_scorpion-face

A scorpion’s face

Uroctonus mordax on 18 May 2015

Uroctonus mordax on 18 May 2015

Uroctonus mordax April 2015

Uroctonus mordax April 2015

Uroctonus mordax April 2015

Uroctonus mordax April 2015

Uroctonus mordax April 2015

Uroctonus mordax April 2015

Uroctonus mordax April 2015

Uroctonus mordax April 2015

Uroctonus mordax

Uroctonus mordax

Uroctonus mordax

Uroctonus mordax

Uroctonus mordax

Uroctonus mordax

Uroctonus mordax 2012

Uroctonus mordax in 2012 under UV

Uroctonus mordax 2012

Uroctonus mordax in 2012 under UV

Uroctonus mordax 2012

Uroctonus mordax in 2012 under UV

Uroctonus mordax 2012

The same Uroctonus mordax in 2012 under white light

2012_IMGP1707

scorpion hatchery uncovered

A scorpion hatchery uncovered

baby scorpions with mom

baby scorpions with mom

baby scorpions with mom

baby scorpions with mom

baby scorpions with mom

baby scorpions with mom

baby-scorpions-with-mom

baby scorpions with mom

baby scorpions with mom

baby scorpions with mom

Uroctonus mordax 2008 May

Uroctonus mordax 2008 May

Uroctonus mordax 2008 May

Uroctonus mordax 2008 May

Uroctonus mordax 2004

Uroctonus mordax 2004

Uroctonus mordax 2004

Uroctonus mordax 2004

Uroctonus mordax 2004

Uroctonus mordax 2004

Uroctonus mordax 2003

Uroctonus mordax 2003

 

Zarhipis integripennis

Zarhipis integripennis
Western Banded Glowworm

 

Zarhipis integripennis

Zarhipis integripennis

Zarhipis integripennis

Zarhipis integripennis

Zarhipis integripennis

Zarhipis integripennis

Zarhipis integripennis

Zarhipis integripennis

Zarhipis integripennis

Zarhipis integripennis

Zarhipis integripennis

Zarhipis integripennis

 

Paeromopus angusticeps buttensis

Paeromopus angusticeps buttensis is one of the millipedes that live here.

It was difficult to photograph this due to it constantly moving so fast that the legs and the body were a blur of motion. The images with detail were obtained by placing the animal in a refrigerator for half an hour prior to taking the photographs.

Paeromopus angusticeps buttensis

A blur of movement.

Paeromopus angusticeps buttensis

Paeromopus angusticeps buttensis

Paeromopus angusticeps buttensis

Paeromopus angusticeps buttensis

Paeromopus angusticeps buttensis

Paeromopus angusticeps buttensis

Paeromopus angusticeps buttensis

Paeromopus angusticeps buttensis

Paeromopus angusticeps buttensis

Paeromopus angusticeps buttensis

Paeromopus angusticeps buttensis

Paeromopus angusticeps buttensis

Paeromopus angusticeps buttensis

Paeromopus angusticeps buttensis

Paeromopus angusticeps buttensis

Paeromopus angusticeps buttensis

Paeromopus angusticeps buttensis

Paeromopus angusticeps buttensis

 

Harpaphe sp.

A Harpaphe sp.

This is also known as the almond-scented millipede due to it producing hydrogen cyanide as a defensive aid.

The roughness on the surface of this first animal is just tiny dew drops.

Harpaphe sp

Harpaphe sp. April 2015

Harpaphe sp

Harpaphe sp. 2015

Harpaphe sp

Harpaphe sp. 2015

Harpaphe sp

Harpaphe sp. 2015

Harpaphe_2015_IMGP2871

Harpaphe sp. 2015

Harpaphe sp. 2015

Harpaphe sp. 2015

Harpaphe sp. 2015

Harpaphe sp. 2015

Harpaphe sp. 2015

Harpaphe sp. 2015

This one from last year is either a juvenile or has just recently molted:

Harpaphe_2014_IMG_0912

Harpaphe_2014_IMG_0915

Harpaphe_2014_IMG_0920

Below is the same one but under UV.
I first noticed a Harpaphe millipede on a dark night wandering around the forest looking for black-light friendly mushrooms. It was apparently sleeping as at first it appeared from a distance to be a cluster of blue bristles. As the light got closer it began to move. It seems clear that black-light bothers arthropods that fluoresce as they actively try to get away from it.

Harpaphe_2014_IMG_0931

millipede

Harpaphe sp.

millipede

Harpaphe sp.

millipede

Harpaphe sp.

Harpaphe sp. millipede

Harpaphe sp.

Harpaphe sp.

Harpaphe sp.

millipede

Harpaphe sp.

millipede

Harpaphe sp.

millipede

Harpaphe sp.

millipede

Harpaphe sp.

millipede

Harpaphe sp.

millipede

Harpaphe sp.

millipede

Harpaphe sp.

millipede

Harpaphe sp.

millipede

Harpaphe sp.

millipede

Harpaphe sp.

millipede

Harpaphe sp.

millipede

Harpaphe sp.

millipede

Harpaphe sp.

millipede

Harpaphe sp.

millipede

Harpaphe sp.

millipede

Harpaphe sp.

millipede

Harpaphe sp.

millipede

Harpaphe sp.

millipede

Harpaphe sp.

millipede

Harpaphe sp.

millipede

Harpaphe sp.

millipede

Harpaphe sp.

millipede

Harpaphe sp.

millipede

Harpaphe sp.

millipede

Harpaphe sp.

millipede

Harpaphe sp.

Harpaphe sp. millipede

Harpaphe sp.

millipede

Harpaphe sp.

Harpaphe sp.

Harpaphe sp.

Harpaphe sp.

Harpaphe sp.

Harpaphe sp.

Harpaphe sp.

Harpaphe sp.

Harpaphe sp.

Harpaphe sp.

Harpaphe sp.

 

Ariolimax columbianus

Ariolimax columbianus is the California Banana Slug.

This is one of three banana slug species in California.

Ariolimax columbianus

Ariolimax columbianus

Ariolimax columbianus

Ariolimax columbianus

Ariolimax columbianus

Ariolimax columbianus

Ariolimax columbianus

Ariolimax columbianus

Ariolimax columbianus

Ariolimax columbianus

Ariolimax columbianus

Ariolimax columbianus

Ariolimax columbianus

Ariolimax columbianus

 

Monadenia infumata

Monadenia infumata is also known as the Redwood-Sideband.

Monadenia infumata is considered to be an imperiled animal species.

 

Redwood Sideband (Monadenia infumata)

Redwood Sideband (Monadenia infumata) eating lichen.

Redwood Sideband (Monadenia infumata)

Monadenia infumata

Redwood Sideband (Monadenia infumata)

Monadenia infumata

Redwood Sideband (Monadenia infumata)

Monadenia infumata

Redwood Sideband (Monadenia infumata)

Monadenia infumata

Redwood Sideband (Monadenia infumata)

Monadenia infumata

Redwood Sideband (Monadenia infumata)

Redwood Sideband (Monadenia infumata)

Redwood Sideband (Monadenia infumata)

Monadenia infumata

Redwood Sideband (Monadenia infumata)

Redwood Sideband (Monadenia infumata)

Redwood Sideband (Monadenia infumata)

Redwood Sideband (Monadenia infumata)

Redwood Sideband (Monadenia infumata)

Redwood Sideband (Monadenia infumata)

Redwood Sideband (Monadenia infumata)

Redwood Sideband (Monadenia infumata)

Redwood Sideband (Monadenia infumata)

Redwood Sideband (Monadenia infumata)

Redwood Sideband (Monadenia infumata)

Redwood Sideband (Monadenia infumata)

Redwood Sideband (Monadenia infumata)

Redwood Sideband (Monadenia infumata)

Redwood Sideband (Monadenia infumata)

Redwood Sideband (Monadenia infumata)

 

 

Acris crepitans

Acris crepitans is also known as the Pacific chorus frog.

This used to be called the Pacific tree frog but someone sensibly decided that it was not an appropriate name since they do not live in trees. I’ve seen them use a puddle of water in the hollowed crotch of a tree branch for raising a crop of tadpoles but it is far more common to find them hanging out next to a clump of grass. This image shows what is the most probable place here to locate a singing frog.

Acris crepitans

Acris crepitans

The name Pacific chorus frog is much more appropriate as this animal may have the most commonly heard frog song in the entire world. Not due to being distributed worldwide but rather for sake of being chosen to be the “typical” sound of frogs used in movies, television and recordings wanting the sound of frogs singing in the background.

These frogs have a fascinating habit of not using permanent or flowing sources of water for egg laying. Instead they select temporary puddles and accumulations following rains. They manage to do this by maturing fast and really small; and then increasing substantially in size.

Every frog on this page is this species and was found within a couple of hundred meters of each other. Sizes are variable due to what was just mentioned. The color is chamaeleonoid in that the color changes between browns and greens. Unlike chamaeleons and anoles the color of these frogs does not change in response to their background changing but rather it is temperature dependent (so the frogs have to change their location to fit their color).

Acris crepitans; the Pacific Chorus frog

A young Pacific chorus frog being discouraged from hot-tubbing.

Acris crepitans; the Pacific Chorus frog

Pacific chorus frog (Acris crepitans)

Acris crepitans

Pacific chorus frog (Acris crepitans)

Pacific chorus frog (Acris crepitans)

Pacific chorus frog (Acris crepitans)

Pacific chorus frog (Acris crepitans)

Pacific chorus frog (Acris crepitans)

Pacific chorus frog (Acris crepitans)

Pacific chorus frog (Acris crepitans)

Pacific chorus frog (Acris crepitans)

Pacific chorus frog (Acris crepitans)

Pacific chorus frog (Acris crepitans)

Pacific chorus frog (Acris crepitans)

Pacific chorus frog (Acris crepitans)

Pacific chorus frog (Acris crepitans)

Pacific chorus frog (Acris crepitans)

Pacific chorus frog (Acris crepitans)

Pacific chorus frog (Acris crepitans)

Pacific chorus frog (Acris crepitans)

Pacific chorus frog (Acris crepitans)

Pacific chorus frog (Acris crepitans)

Pacific chorus frog (Acris crepitans)

Pacific chorus frog (Acris crepitans)

Pacific chorus frog (Acris crepitans)

Pacific chorus frog (Acris crepitans)

Peltis pippingskoeldi

This Peltis species is one of the “bark beetles”

Peltis sp.

Peltis pippingskoeldi beetles excavatiing a conk.

 

Peltis sp.

Peltis pippingskoeldi eating a conk.

These like to “play dead” when they get disturbed. I was initially puzzled wondering why I was finding only dead ones.

Peltis sp.

Peltis pippingskoeldi

 

Leave them alone and they come back to life pretty fast.

a conk

Their chosen conk; a young Fomitopsis pinicola

conk-eaters

Peltis pippingskoeldi starting some two level excavations on that conk.

 

 

 

 

Peltis sp.

Peltis pippingskoeldi

Peltis sp.

Peltis pippingskoeldi

Peltis sp.

Peltis pippingskoeldi

Peltis sp.

Peltis pippingskoeldi

Peltis sp.

Peltis pippingskoeldi

Peltis sp.

Peltis pippingskoeldi

 

I am believing that these next ones are some sort of beetle larvae (based on their body and the configuration of antennae).

conk with beetle larvae

Another conk with beetle larvae

beetle larvae

beetle larvae

beetle larvae

beetle larvae

beetle larvae

beetle larvae